Long Neck


Masai Giraffe
Scientific Name: Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi


From LA Zoo Website
Did you know the giraffe’s tongue is black? The Masai giraffe relies on its long, muscular tongue for reaching between long thorns to feed on tender tree leaves and twigs.

STATUS: The Masai giraffe is common and not currently at risk, but the herds are dependent on good conservation programs throughout their range.

HABITAT: Masai giraffes live on the African savannahs of Kenya and Tanzania in East Africa.

DIET: Giraffes can spend 16 to 20 hours a day browsing on leaves, twigs, bark, flowers, and fruit from more than 60 different kinds of plants. They can go without water for several months if they have enough fresh browse. The whistling-thorn acacia is one of their favorites!

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS: Giraffes are the tallest land mammal, and Masai giraffes can grow up to 17 feet tall and weigh 2,700 pounds. Because of its long legs and long neck, the giraffe doesn’t have to compete with other animals for its food. The Masai giraffe is identified by its lacy-edged or irregular spot pattern. Both males and females may have two to five horns covered with skin growing out of the top of the skull.

A baby weighs in at about 150 pounds and is already six feet tall. The calf needs to stand shortly after birth because only 25% of the young survive attacks the first year from lions, cheetahs, leopards, and hyenas. An adult giraffe is rarely attacked and may live up to 25 years.

Zebra Stripes


Taken at the Los Angeles Zoo, CA, 2012.

From Out of africa website
Swahili Name: Punda Milia
Scientific Name: Burchell’s zebra (Equus burchellii); Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi)
Size: 45 to 55 inches at the shoulder (Burchell’s); 50 to 60 inches (Grevy’s)
Weight: Burchell’s: 485 to 550 pounds (Burchell’s); 770 to 990 pounds (Grevy’s)
Lifespan: 40 years in captivity
Habitat: Woodlands to open plains
Diet: Herbivores
Gestation: 12 months (Burchell’s); 13 months (Grevy’s)
Predators: Lions, hyenas, hunting dogs, leopards, cheetahs

American Flamingo at large


AMERICAN FLAMINGO

 

Scientific Name: Phoenicopterus ruber

Fast Fact:
The American flamingo is the most brightly colored of all flamingo species.

From the Los Angeles Zoo Website

These birds’ most noticeable features are probably their long, skinny legs—which are longer in relation to body size than any other bird. They often stand on just one leg, even while sleeping, with the other tucked up close to their body. Besides being comfortable for the animal, this posture helps reduce heat loss through the legs and feet.

STATUS: American flamingos are listed as Least Concern by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

HABITAT: Flamingos are found in a wide variety of both salt and fresh water habitats, most notably in the shallows of salt lakes, estuaries, and lagoons. American flamingos are from the Caribbean Islands and the nearby mainland coasts.

DIET: These birds eat small shrimp, worms, insect larvae, and aquatic plants. They derive their pink coloration from the natural carotenoid pigment found in the foods they eat. In captivity they are fed a manufactured diet that contains a natural pigment to maintain their color.

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS: The American flamingo has bright pink plumage. Its bill is salmon-colored with a black tip. The flamingo’s long neck and bill, fashioned at a 45-degree angle, are adaptations for the filter feeding system employed by the bird. When the bird puts its head down to feed, the bill is parallel to the bottom and submerged in water. By a tongue pumping action, tiny plants and animals are sifted from the bottom mud and forced through comb-like plates on the edge of the bill.

Flamingo Fun

Flamingos are highly social animals and breed only in colonies that may range in size from a few dozen to tens of thousands of birds. The courtship rituals involve complex synchronized dancing, head flagging, neck stretching, and honking, which can be quite amusing to witness. Nests are built about 5 feet apart and the entire colony will lay eggs at about the same time. Chicks are hatched gray after an incubation period of 27 to 31 days. The characteristic pink color occurs at about two years and they are sexually mature at three.

Weird look, Weird thoughts – Southern Gerenuk


why are you here? why are you just staring at me? do you know my name? what is my name? I wonder what is around the corner from here, where I hear the roar of lions and bears. I wonder what could be over the hills and over the skies where my kind came from. This grass is so good, and this shade is a god send in the summer. I’m glad I don’t have to run from the bad cats anymore or ever and I am so happy to have all my family here with me with these weird humans always checking up on us.

  • Conservation is a serious feat and even with the sometimes sad reality of having these wonderful creatures in captivity, we all need to understand the vast benefits of research and conservation through the zoological community.


(from the Los Angeles Zoo website )

Southern Gerenuk
Scientific Name: Litocranius walleri
Fast Fact:

  • Gerenuk means ‘giraffe-necked’ in the Somali language.
  • Although these beautiful and graceful antelopes were not known to European scientists until 1898, they have been represented in ancient Egyptian art since 5600 B.C.

STATUS: Gerenuks are common, but declining in number because they are hunted for their skins. They are listed as Near Threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).